Home » About DPHHS » News Releases » 2016 » Jefferson School, Children’s Trust Fund and Big Sky UAV produce memorable ‘Go Blue’ video

Jefferson School, Children’s Trust Fund and Big Sky UAV produce memorable ‘Go Blue’ video

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

April 14, 2016

Contact:  Jon Ebelt, Public Information Officer, DPHHS, (406) 444-0936

                Chuck Council, Communications Specialist, DPHHS, (406) 444-4391

 

 

Jefferson School, Children’s Trust Fund and Big Sky UAV produce memorable ‘Go Blue’ video

Jefferson School, the Montana Children’s Trust Fund and Big Sky UAV teamed up on Friday, April 15, 2016, to produce a memorable 30-second video that was filmed from high above using an (UAV) unmanned aerial vehicle, or drone, during the Pinwheels for Prevention Parade in Helena.

The dramatic video can be viewed here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZEH8N5_NLtQ

After the 300 Jefferson School students and faculty paraded from the school to the Capitol, they were greeted by blue flags marked on the front lawn spelling out ‘#GOBLUE’. Every individual was needed to fill out the hashtag and letters. Montanans are asked to post on social media this month using the hashtag #GoBlue.

Jefferson School Principal Lona Carter-Scanlon rehearsed with the students prior to event a spirited ‘Go Blue’ cheer.

Jamey Petersen of the Montana Children’s Trust Fund mapped out the words using blue flags the night before.

But, there was one final missing piece needed to make it all happen – capturing the moment from an aerial view.

Petersen knew just who to ask. Husband Jack ‘Pepper’ Petersen of Big Sky UAV was more than willing donate his services to produce the eye-catching video. Together, Petersen and coworker Greg Heide worked together to maneuver the UAV high into the air to film the scene. The video starts out with a tight shot, before panning wide and ending with the Capitol in the background.

At the same time, students waved blue pinwheels and cheered ‘Go Blue, Go Blue, Yeaahhhh!’

“It was so much fun to be a part of this, and the kids really thought it was cool they were being filmed from the air by a UAV,” Carter-Scanlon said.  “And, of course, this was also for a great cause. Child abuse in Montana is real, and we are proud to be a part of raising awareness about this important issue.”

Jack Petersen was honored Big Sky UAV could help. “This was just a fun way to use our UAVs to produce a video that I really think captured the moment,” he said. “I’m glad we were able to help, and I hope this helps raise even more awareness about the prevention of child abuse and neglect in Montana. The kids were great to work with, and I’m proud of them.”

Pinwheels for Prevention is a national public awareness campaign built around the symbol of the pinwheel, which represents a happy and uplifting symbol of childhood and conveys the message that every child deserves the chance to be raised in a healthy, safe, and nurturing environment.

All Montanans are asked to Go Blue every Monday by wearing blue clothing to show support for Montana families.

For more information about other Children’s Trust Fund Child Abuse & Neglect Prevention Month activities go to http://dphhs.mt.gov/childrenstrustfund/preventionmonth

About the Montana Children’s Trust Fund

This month and throughout the year, the Montana Children’s Trust Fund encourages all individuals and organizations to play a role in making Montana a better place for children and families. By ensuring that parents have the knowledge, skills, and resources they need to care for their children, we can help promote children’s social and emotional well-being and prevent child maltreatment within families and communities.

Created by the Montana Legislature in 1985, the Montana Children’s Trust Fund works to reduce and ultimately eliminating maltreatment of Montana children. The trust fund provides financial support to local programs across the state to prevent child abuse and neglect and strengthen families. For more information about the Montana Children’s Trust Fund contact Jamey Petersen at jpetersen@mt.gov or 444-3002.