Department of Public Health and Human Services

Home » Health in the 406 » Health in the 406 Archive » Injury Prevention

Main Content

Injury Prevention

Email address:
Name (optional):

Unsubscribe

Health in the 406 and health information at external links should not be taken as medical advice or as a substitute for health care services.  Links are provided for informational purposes only, and do not constitute an endorsement or an approval of the opinions or information of the external site. Please bear in mind that information available at external links may change following publication of Health in the 406.  DPHHS bears no responsibility for the accuracy, legality or content of the external site.

  Injury Prevention

Health in the 406 banner

 

July 2017 - Recreational Water Safety

  • Diarrhea and Swimming Don’t Mix”: water borne diseases like cryptosporidium and Giardia can be found in natural water or get introduced when someone with diarrhea swims in a pool, and cysts may remain infective for 2-6 months in a moist environment.
  • In 2015, 14 Montanans lost their lives due to drowning -- always remember to keep an eye on small children around recreational waters and wear your lifejacket.
  • Environmental health specialists inspect around 800 pools a year to ensure safety, everyone can play a part by refraining from swimming when sick and showering before entering the pool.

March 2017 - Opioid Overdose Prevention

  • The rate of prescription drug overdose deaths in Montana has doubled in the last 15 years with nearly 700 preventable deaths occurring during this time period.
  • 60% of all opioid prescriptions in Montana do not end up being fully used, increasing the chances for misuse and abuse.  Learn more about safer storage and disposal opportunities in your community.
  • Opioid use mixed with alcohol and with other types of medications (e.g. benzodiazepines) can significantly increase one’s risk of overdoses – make sure your provider knows every medication (prescription and others) you are currently using.

June 2016 - Prevention of Motor Vehicle Crashes

  • Motor vehicle crashes are the second leading cause of traumatic death in Montana, costing $299 million per year in medical expenses and lost productivity.
  • Montana had 2,246 fatalities from motor vehicle crashes from 2006–2015; 53% of those fatalities involved impaired drivers and 66% in vehicles were not wearing a seat belt.
  • Buckling up and buckling children in an appropriate car/booster seat reduces the risk of injury and death in a crash by 50%.

January 2016 - Falls

  • Falls in Montana cause an average of 3,400 hospital stays and 19,800 emergency department visits each year costing over $135 million.
  • Montanans (aged 45 or older) with arthritis have twice the risk of falling compared to adults without arthritis.
  • Exercise focusing on leg strength and balance can prevent fallsFree or low-cost exercise programs exist in Montana for adults with arthritis.