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E-Cigarettes and Smokefree Laws

Adding E-Cigarettes to Smokefree Laws

E-Cigarettes

Why add e-cigarettes to smokefree laws?

Air free of both smoke and e-cigarette aerosol should be the goal and standard to protect health.

In Montana, youth are using e-cigarettes at a rate 5.5 times the rate of use among adults. Unrestricted use of these products renormalizes tobacco use behavior and serves as a gateway to other tobacco products and substances.2 One study has demonstrated that the simple act of observing e-cigarette use evokes smoking urge and desire among young adult smokers and normalizes smoking behavior.5

Secondhand smoke exposure is deadly. In the past 50 years, secondhand smoke exposure is estimated to have caused nearly 2.5 million deaths in nonsmoking Americans.1

Electronic cigarette, or e-cigarette, use has the potential to involuntarily expose children and adolescents, pregnant women, and nonusers to numerous aerosolized substances.2

Including e-cigarettes in smokefree laws protects the public from e-cigarette aerosol, which contains ultrafine particles that have been known to be toxic, can cause cancer, and lead to respiratory and heart disease.2,3,4 

Montana Counties with E-Cigarettes in Local Clean Indoor Air Act Protocol

What assistance is available?

The Montana Tobacco Use Prevention Program is offering assistance to any localities or businesses within the state that are interested in including e-cigarettes in their smokefree laws. Free “no smoking” signs with e-cigarettes included are available on the MTUPP online store.

MTUPP has Tobacco Prevention Specialists in your community to provide professional guidance and help to develop and with the process of including e-cigarettes in your smokefree policies.

Sources

  1. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2014.
  2. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. E-Cigarette Use Among Youth and Young Adults. A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2016.
  3. Cheng T. Chemical evaluation of electronic cigarettes. Tob Control 2014;23(Suppl2):ii11–17.
  4. Loewenstein DK, MiddleKauff, HR. Electronic Cigarette Device-Related Hazards: A Call for Immediate FDA Regulation. Am J Prev Med;52(2):229-231.
  5. King AC, Smith LJ, McNamara PJ, Cao D. Second Generation Electronic Nicotine Delivery System Vape Pen Exposure Generalizes as a Smoking Cue. Nicotine Tob Res 2017; ntw327.