Enter Title

Priority Area 2: Chronic Disease Prevention and Self-Management

Much of the chronic disease burden is attributable to a short list of key risk factors, including tobacco use, obesity, physical inactivity, and poor nutrition. Tobacco use remains the leading cause of preventable death, with 1,600 tobacco-related deaths occurring in Montana each year. Twenty-six percent of Montana adults and 33% of Montana youth currently use some type of tobacco product. This number is even higher for American Indians at 43% for adults and 40% for youth. Obesity results from a combination of poor dietary patterns and physical inactivity. More than one in ten Montana youth (12%) were obese in 2017 and one in four Montana adults (26%) in 2016. Again, this rate is much higher for Montana’s American Indian population at 20% for youth and 32% for adults. Forty-two percent of Montana adults and 72% of Montana youth do not meet the national physical activity recommendations. Montana ranks 46th in the nation for colorectal cancer screening, with only 62% of Montanans up-to-date with screening.

Goals

  1. Prevent commercial tobacco use among youth and adults.
  2. Make active living and healthy eating easy, safe, and accessible everywhere Montanans live, work, learn, and play.
  3. Increase awareness and decrease prevalence of modifiable risk factors for chronic disease.

Objectives for all Montanans by 2023

  • Decrease the percent of Montana adults who currently use tobacco from 26% to 24% (Baseline: MT BRFSS, 2016)
  • Decrease the percent of Montana high school students who currently use tobacco from 33% to 29% (Baseline: MT YRBS, 2017)
  • Decrease the percent of Montana adults who are currently obese from 26% to 23% (Baseline: MT BRFSS, 2016)
  • Decrease the percent of Montana high school students who are currently obese from 12% to 9% (Baseline: MT YRBS, 2017)
  • Increase the percent of Montana men and women aged 50 to 75 who report being up-to-date with colorectal cancer screening from 62% to 80% (Baseline: MT BRFSS, 2016)

Objectives to improve health equity by 2023

  • Decrease the percent of Medicaid members who currently use tobacco from 15% to 14% (Baseline: Medicaid data, 2017)
  • Decrease the percent of American Indian adults who currently use commercial tobacco from 43% to 39% (Baseline: MT BRFSS, 2016)
  • Decrease the percent of American Indian youth who currently use commercial tobacco from 40% to 36% (Baseline: MT YRBS, 2017)
  • Establish a baseline and decrease the percent of Medicaid adult members who are currently obese.
  • Decrease the percent of American Indian adults who are currently obese from 32% to 28% (Baseline: MT BRFSS, 2016)
  • Establish a baseline and decrease the percent of Medicaid youth who are currently obese.
  • Decrease the percent of American Indian youth who are currently obese from 20% to 15% (Baseline: MT YRBS, 2017)
  • Increase the percent of Medicaid adults aged 50 to 75 who report being up to date with colorectal cancer screening from 9.9% to 10.4% (Baseline: Medicaid data, 2017)
  • Increase the percent of American Indian adults aged 50 to 75 who report being up to date with colorectal cancer screening from 46% to 63% (Baseline: MT BRFSS, 2016).

Prevention and health promotion strategies

  • Implement promising practices and evidence-based programs that facilitate chronic disease prevention and self-management (e.g. Walk with Ease, Worksite Wellness Programs, Rx Trails, Diabetes Prevention Program [DPP], Diabetes Self-Management Education and Support [DSMES] programs, Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative, Women, Infants and Children [WIC] Breastfeeding Peer Counselor Program, Montana Tobacco Quit Line, American Indian Commercial Tobacco Quit Line) and increase referrals to those programs.
  • Implement public education campaigns to increase awareness of behaviors that address chronic disease prevention and self-management.
  • Increase cancer screening using nationally recognized guidelines for breast, cervical, and colorectal cancers.

Clinical strategies

  • Advocate for policy and workflow changes within healthcare systems to increase screening,counseling, referrals, and high quality care. Seek out involvement with Urban Indian Health Centers and tribal health departments to participate in such projects.
  • Increase referrals to evidence-based chronic disease prevention and self-management programs(e.g. Montana Tobacco Quit Line, American Indian Commercial Tobacco Quit Line, Diabetes Prevention Program [DPP], Diabetes Self-Management Education and Support [DSMES], Walk With Ease, and Chronic Disease Self-Management Programs [CDSMP]).
  • Provide ongoing resources and support to birth facilities and staff to become certified by the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative.
  • Provide ongoing resources and culturally appropriate trainings to support breastfeeding among American Indian populations.
  • Refer every WIC participant who is overweight/obese to a registered dietitian for nutrition education.
  • Implement evidence-based interventions and supporting strategies to increase breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer screening rates in clinical health system settings.

Policy strategies

  • Promote improvement and implementation of school wellness policies, including smoke-free and tobacco-free environments in communities and on reservations, access to nutritious food, active transportation, physical education, recreation facilities open to the community, and reduced screen time use.
  • Promote and support the implementation of local community active transportation policies.
  • Support creation of worksite policies that promote healthy work environments such as increasing opportunities for employees to engage in physical activity and improving access to healthy food.
  • Support partners to implement Tobacco 21, include e-cigarettes in local Clean Indoor Air Act protocols, and increase the tobacco tax on all tobacco products.

Healthy equity strategies

  • Develop and disseminate culturally appropriate chronic disease prevention and self-management education materials for target populations.
  • Increase access to evidence-based programs for chronic disease prevention and self-management for vulnerable populations (including telehealth to rural and frontier areas, accessibility adaptations for people with disabilities, locations on American Indian reservations, team-based care, training for healthcare professionals, and support for Medicaid members).

Text/HTML

Workgroup meeting materials

Date Agenda Minutes
September 10, 2020 09/10/2020 09/10/2020
May 29, 2020 05/29/2020 05/29/2020
February 27, 2020 02/27/2020 02/27/2020
December 2, 2019 12/02/2019 12/02/2019
September 6, 2019 09/06/2019 09/06/2019
May 31, 2019 05/31/2019 05/31/2019

Data

You can also develop customized reports about some of the chronic disease metrics using MT-IBIS. For help with MT-IBIS, contact the Office of Epidemiology and Scientific Support (OESS)

You can also access all recent data reports on multiple topics from OESS or visit the Data & Statistics page maintained by the Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Bureau to explore recent chronic disease surveillance reports by topic.